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University of Connecticut Neag School of Education ORCA

In My Class:  Lessons

This location offers a set of lessons linked to each of the components of online reading comprehension. After you have considered your own students’ strengths and areas of need, you can access or adapt lessons focused on specific skills to integrate instruction in online reading comprehension into your classroom curricula.

To access lessons, simply click on one of the links below.

Reading to Locate  

Students learn how to use search engines, efficiently read search results, and identify websites with information that can be used to solve an information problem scenario.

 

Lesson Title

 

Lesson Overview

 

Understanding Search Engines

Students identify the basic parts of a web search engine, define web search terms, and learn to "read" a web search results page.

Source: Google Web Search Lesson created by Cheryl Davis, Kathleen Ferenz, and Lucy Gray

 

Understanding Search Results

Students learn about the different parts of the results page and how to evaluate individual results based on cues like web addresses and snippets.

Source: Google Search Literacy Lesson Plans

 

Conducting Effective Keyword Searches

Students use query strategies to refine their search for information on the Internet.

Source: Google Web Search Lesson created by Cheryl Davis, Kathleen Ferenz, and Lucy Gray

 

Smart Keyword Searching

Students learn how to use more than one word and synonyms to refine their search. This lesson is a little simpler than lesson on effective keyword searching. Note that the link to the left takes you to a page where you will need to click on "Printable Curriculum," which will then take you to a series of lessons.

Source: CyberSmart! Curriculum by Common Sense Media

 

Reading Search Results

Students learn how to closely read and strategically navigate a list of search results to determine which website best meets their needs.

Source: Instructional Strategies for Critically Evaluating Online Information created by Julie Coiro

 

Investigating Different Page Formats for Research Evidence

Students learn to recognize different web page formats (e.g., blogs, wikis, discussion lists, informational websites, question & answer sites, news articles, and scholarly works) and identify the format most likely to provide the evidence they need.

Source: Google Search Literacy Lesson Plans

 

Reading Within Websites

Students learn how to preview a website’s homepage for organizational features and efficiently navigate to relevant information that meets their needs.

Source: Instructional Strategies for Critically Evaluating Online Information created by Julie Coiro

 

Reading to Evaluate

Students learn how to identify a website’s author and evaluate his/her level of expertise, consider the author’s point of view, and evaluate the reliability of author claims and evidence related to the problem scenario.

 

Lesson Title

 

Lesson Overview

 

Understanding Aspects of Critical Evaluation

Students can use these extended definitions and companion media elements to understand important evaluation terms to consider including authors, publishers, accuracy, bias, expertise, and evidence.

Source: 21st Century Information Fluency MicroModules

 

Identifying High Quality Sites

Students use a checklist and discussion to evaluate the purpose of websites and the trustworthiness of authors. This lesson is an introduction to these ideas.  Note that the link to the left takes you to a page where you will need to click on "Printable Curriculum," which will then take you to a series of lessons.

Source: CyberSmart! Curriculum by Common Sense Media

 

Evaluating Credibility of Sources

Students learn to consider, tone, style, audience, and purpose to determine the credibility of a source. This lesson is designed for more advanced learners. 

Source: Google Search Literacy Lesson Plans

 

Think and Check: Evaluating Reliability with Multiple Checkpoints

Students learn to monitor and show evidence of their use of multiple critical reading strategies in order to determine the reliability of information they encounter on the Internet. 

Source: Instructional Strategies for Critically Evaluating Online Information created by Julie Coiro

 

Recognizing Bias

Students learn to critique a set of videos according to the degree of bias, the purpose for the bias, and the impression the messages leave on others.

Source: Google Search Literacy Lesson Plans

 

Evaluation Wizard

Students can use this wizard tool to consider all the elements they have learned (author, publisher, objectivity, date, accuracy, evidence, and connected links) and print out an instant evaluation report. 

Source: 21st Century Information Fluency Project

 

Reading to Synthesize

Students learn how to integrate information intratextually (across multiple claims within one website) and intertextually (across multiple websites) in their own words, take a position on the issues involved, and use evidence from multiple online sources to support their thinking.

 

Lesson Title

 

Lesson Overview

 

Summarize and Synthesize but Don’t Plagiarize

Students learn differences between copying, summarizing, and synthesizing and practice composing examples of a summary and a synthesis of the same source of information.

Source: Instructional Strategies for Critically Evaluating Online Information created by Julie Coiro

 

Note, Cluster, Label, and Connect

Students use a digital graphic organizer to select, cluster, label, and connect phrases in order to create and present a visual synthesis of key ideas from one source or multiple sources.

Source: created by Julie Coiro

 

Reading to Communicate

Students learn how to access information in an email or wiki space and respond with information they have learned about the scenario in an appropriately crafted, visually organized, and clear message.

 

Lesson Title

 

Lesson Overview

 

Understanding Parts of An Email Message

Students are guided through the parts of an email message (e.g., subject, greetings, content, sign-offs) and how to use each for different purposes. 

Source: Learn the Net

 

Writing A Semi-Formal Email Message

Students learn how to write and send a semi-formal email message – similar to the email expected in the ORCA tasks. 

Source: Teaching English – British Council and BBC

 

Email Etiquette

Students learn key tips for how to compose an email to someone they don’t know.

Source: Purdue Online Writing Lab

 

Practice Writing Emails for Different Purposes

Students engage in a series of email writing activities for different purposes. These lessons are geared specifically toward English Language Learners, but could be useful for all students. 

Source: MacMillan Business

 

Wikis in Plain English

Students learn, through this video, what a wiki is and how to add, remove, and edit text and pages on a wiki.

Source: Common Craft

 

A Wiki Guide for Teachers

Teachers are introduced to ideas for how to set up a wiki and use it in their classroom. 

Source: Cfinnegan, a teacher from New Jersey

 

Online Collaborative Writing Using Wikis

 

Students are given an opportunity to write collaboratively while learning how to write on a wiki page, edit an existing page, and view previous edits. [This lesson would be adapted to fit the topics of your curriculum.]

Source: Article for The Internet TESOL Journal written by Paul Size

 

Using Wikis in the Classroom

Teachers are guided through explanations of a wiki, how to use wikis in classroom settings, and how to engage students with various wiki roles, learn about wiki attitudes toward projects, and how to make significant contributions and constructive modifications in their wiki posts.

Source: William Ferriter, Teacher in North Carolina